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FDA's Culture Is Mendelian Dominant Over 23andme's Business Model

del-fi:

I’ve been following the 23andme saga with dread and fascination and frustration since it hit earlier in the week. If you’re not up to date, David Dobbs has the canonical collection of stories to get you there.

This is a post about business models and culture clashes. It’s long. I should…

#ourhosts

Local Dad Calls to Check In On Daughter in NYC: The Best Small Town News Coverage of Hurricane Sandy

gawkercom:

Every black-clad, chain-smoking SoHo gallery owner and martini-lunching, town car-riding hedge fund manager started out life as a chubbly, freckle-faced kid from South Dakota.

Their parents and hometown newspapers were worried about them during the storm.

These are their stories:

Read More

izmia:

Ballet Soldier - Asker Balesi

casipicles:

It might be time to fix up the balconies.  Just saying.

casipicles:

It might be time to fix up the balconies. Just saying.

thedailyfeed:

An incredibly simple marketing decision turned a “sissy” cigarette into a blockbuster product and created one of the most indelible images in advertising history: the Marlboro Man. 

In 1954, Chicago adman Leo Burnett was stuck with an impossible assignment: Take the Marlboro cigarette — a filtered English brand with 1 percent market share, a “sissy” smoke that had never caught on with its target audience of well-bred women — and make it a blockbuster product for men. Burnett, a legendary figure in his own right, got a crack team together and came up with what he later called a “dumbbell simple” idea: an American cowboy with a cigarette dangling from his lips.
 Burnett, who didn’t care much for advertising research, later recalled that he had simply gathered his employees in a meeting and asked them, “What’s the most masculine image you can think of?” One of the copywriters piped right up with, “A cowboy.” And that was that.

thedailyfeed:

An incredibly simple marketing decision turned a “sissy” cigarette into a blockbuster product and created one of the most indelible images in advertising history: the Marlboro Man. 

In 1954, Chicago adman Leo Burnett was stuck with an impossible assignment: Take the Marlboro cigarette — a filtered English brand with 1 percent market share, a “sissy” smoke that had never caught on with its target audience of well-bred women — and make it a blockbuster product for men. Burnett, a legendary figure in his own right, got a crack team together and came up with what he later called a “dumbbell simple” idea: an American cowboy with a cigarette dangling from his lips.

 Burnett, who didn’t care much for advertising research, later recalled that he had simply gathered his employees in a meeting and asked them, “What’s the most masculine image you can think of?” One of the copywriters piped right up with, “A cowboy.” And that was that.

(via pegobry)

In operant conditioning, a variable-interval schedule is a schedule of reinforcement where a response is rewarded after an unpredictable amount of time has passed. This schedule produces a slow, steady rate of response.

Variable Interval Schedule

So this is apparently why I obsessively check my email/twitterstream ALL THE TIME.

HT @jemimakiss, from her recent Observer article about digital detoxes.

This phenomenon can result in some magnificently bizarre behaviour. Psychologist BF Skinner described the attempts at control based on a variable-interval schedule in a classic article from 1947: ‘Superstition’ in the Pigeon (First published in Journal of Experimental Psychology, 38, 168-172).

In this article, Skinner describes the behaviour of a pigeon that was rewarded with food and water at random intervals. To make sense of this effect that had no apparent (or logical) cause that it could learn, the pigeon began to create patterns that it believed created the reward.

The experiment might be said to demonstrate a sort of superstition. The bird behaves as if there were a causal relation between its behavior and the presentation of food, although such a relation is lacking. There are many analogies in human behavior.  Rituals for changing one’s luck at cards are good examples. A few accidental connections between a ritual and favorable consequences suffice to set up and maintain the behavior in spite of many unreinforced instances. The bowler who has released a ball down the alley but continues to behave as if he were controlling it by twisting and turning his arm and shoulder is another case in point. These behaviors have, of course, no real effect upon one’s luck or upon a ball half way down an alley, just as in the present case the food would appear as often if the pigeon did nothing — or, more strictly speaking, did something else.

I haven’t yet started dancing on one foot or spinning around twice to stimulate a new text message, twitter mention/DM or email, but I have integrated behavioural patterns - like checking my phone the instant I wake up or arrive at a destination - into my daily digital routine.

(via untanglingtheweb)

(via untanglingtheweb)

ilovecharts:

Apparently I’m all about Twitter charts today. Keep ‘em coming!

ilovecharts:

Apparently I’m all about Twitter charts today. Keep ‘em coming!

minestrone:

Copy & More: ambient

Client: Copy Shop

Agency: Scholtz & Friends - Germany

FDA's Culture Is Mendelian Dominant Over 23andme's Business Model

del-fi:

I’ve been following the 23andme saga with dread and fascination and frustration since it hit earlier in the week. If you’re not up to date, David Dobbs has the canonical collection of stories to get you there.

This is a post about business models and culture clashes. It’s long. I should…

svbyndrs:

itt még volt fésűje

svbyndrs:

itt még volt fésűje

#ourhosts

Local Dad Calls to Check In On Daughter in NYC: The Best Small Town News Coverage of Hurricane Sandy

gawkercom:

Every black-clad, chain-smoking SoHo gallery owner and martini-lunching, town car-riding hedge fund manager started out life as a chubbly, freckle-faced kid from South Dakota.

Their parents and hometown newspapers were worried about them during the storm.

These are their stories:

Read More

(Source: druccs, via kenyatta)

izmia:

Ballet Soldier - Asker Balesi

(Source: jandirafeijo)

casipicles:

It might be time to fix up the balconies.  Just saying.

casipicles:

It might be time to fix up the balconies. Just saying.

thedailyfeed:

An incredibly simple marketing decision turned a “sissy” cigarette into a blockbuster product and created one of the most indelible images in advertising history: the Marlboro Man. 

In 1954, Chicago adman Leo Burnett was stuck with an impossible assignment: Take the Marlboro cigarette — a filtered English brand with 1 percent market share, a “sissy” smoke that had never caught on with its target audience of well-bred women — and make it a blockbuster product for men. Burnett, a legendary figure in his own right, got a crack team together and came up with what he later called a “dumbbell simple” idea: an American cowboy with a cigarette dangling from his lips.
 Burnett, who didn’t care much for advertising research, later recalled that he had simply gathered his employees in a meeting and asked them, “What’s the most masculine image you can think of?” One of the copywriters piped right up with, “A cowboy.” And that was that.

thedailyfeed:

An incredibly simple marketing decision turned a “sissy” cigarette into a blockbuster product and created one of the most indelible images in advertising history: the Marlboro Man. 

In 1954, Chicago adman Leo Burnett was stuck with an impossible assignment: Take the Marlboro cigarette — a filtered English brand with 1 percent market share, a “sissy” smoke that had never caught on with its target audience of well-bred women — and make it a blockbuster product for men. Burnett, a legendary figure in his own right, got a crack team together and came up with what he later called a “dumbbell simple” idea: an American cowboy with a cigarette dangling from his lips.

 Burnett, who didn’t care much for advertising research, later recalled that he had simply gathered his employees in a meeting and asked them, “What’s the most masculine image you can think of?” One of the copywriters piped right up with, “A cowboy.” And that was that.

(via pegobry)

In operant conditioning, a variable-interval schedule is a schedule of reinforcement where a response is rewarded after an unpredictable amount of time has passed. This schedule produces a slow, steady rate of response.

Variable Interval Schedule

So this is apparently why I obsessively check my email/twitterstream ALL THE TIME.

HT @jemimakiss, from her recent Observer article about digital detoxes.

This phenomenon can result in some magnificently bizarre behaviour. Psychologist BF Skinner described the attempts at control based on a variable-interval schedule in a classic article from 1947: ‘Superstition’ in the Pigeon (First published in Journal of Experimental Psychology, 38, 168-172).

In this article, Skinner describes the behaviour of a pigeon that was rewarded with food and water at random intervals. To make sense of this effect that had no apparent (or logical) cause that it could learn, the pigeon began to create patterns that it believed created the reward.

The experiment might be said to demonstrate a sort of superstition. The bird behaves as if there were a causal relation between its behavior and the presentation of food, although such a relation is lacking. There are many analogies in human behavior.  Rituals for changing one’s luck at cards are good examples. A few accidental connections between a ritual and favorable consequences suffice to set up and maintain the behavior in spite of many unreinforced instances. The bowler who has released a ball down the alley but continues to behave as if he were controlling it by twisting and turning his arm and shoulder is another case in point. These behaviors have, of course, no real effect upon one’s luck or upon a ball half way down an alley, just as in the present case the food would appear as often if the pigeon did nothing — or, more strictly speaking, did something else.

I haven’t yet started dancing on one foot or spinning around twice to stimulate a new text message, twitter mention/DM or email, but I have integrated behavioural patterns - like checking my phone the instant I wake up or arrive at a destination - into my daily digital routine.

(via untanglingtheweb)

(via untanglingtheweb)

ilovecharts:

Apparently I’m all about Twitter charts today. Keep ‘em coming!

ilovecharts:

Apparently I’m all about Twitter charts today. Keep ‘em coming!

minestrone:

Copy & More: ambient

Client: Copy Shop

Agency: Scholtz & Friends - Germany

Local Dad Calls to Check In On Daughter in NYC: The Best Small Town News Coverage of Hurricane Sandy
"In operant conditioning, a variable-interval schedule is a schedule of reinforcement where a response is rewarded after an unpredictable amount of time has passed. This schedule produces a slow, steady rate of response."

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